LAWS FOR PAWS

For pet owners on the lookout for furry-friendly accommodation to call home, finding a rental can be a real hairy dilemma; choices are limited, and many residential agreements having strict no-pet rules in place.

But with tough market conditions swaying more landlords to keep an open mind when it comes to allowing pets, and with government bodies pushing for policy to give tenants more freedom in the decision, there is some good news.

To ease the challenge at Prudential Real Estate, we ensure that pet preferences are included in the residential tenancy agreement so that landlords take time to consider the matter – a component that is often left out.

As it stands today, there are a number of ways you can assure your voice and needs are heard, whether you’re a property owner or tenant.

Tips for tenants

Be aware of strata titled properties

As some strata properties don’t allow pets, it’s vital to first find out if there are any restrictions in place before going to your landlord.

Be upfront (and references help)

If you’d like to keep a pet, take the time to request the permission of your landlord. Offering information about your pet, such as references from past landlords, medical records or attention to other issues that may arise can make a compelling case and establish trust.

Know the limits

With approval in most cases only for the pet requested in the application, understand that no other pet can occupy the property without permission, unless stated in the agreement. If your pet causes disturbance to neighbours or damage to common property, the property owner reserves the right to provide a warning, revoke permission or make a case for eviction.

Tips for landlords

Consider the alternative

When looking for a tenant, property owners who opt for a no-pet tenancy can in fact eliminate two-thirds of the marketplace, which can extend the time taken to secure one – so be sure to look at all options before coming to a decision.

Revisit the agreement

Ensure that the residential tenancy agreement reflects your preferences. Should you reconsider allowing for pets, be sure to apply this to a new tenancy agreement in order to honour a request for a pet – or to state this when listing your property, so that you can potentially expand your pool of candidates.

Want more information? Visit www.tenants.org.au/resource/guide-renting-pets-nsw or call Prudential Real Estate on (02) 4628 0033 or via campbelltown@prudential.com.au.

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